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Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Taking care of your skin when you’re sick

I remember when I got it—the “crud” as some call it: chest and sinus congestion with laryngitis. Oh happy day! Not your normal cold, this lasted well over 10 days; ten days I couldn’t go in to work. I was simply too sick to do much more than lie around, drink fluids, and take medications (both allopathic, mainstream meds and “non-traditional” herbal supplements).

Being down for the count also meant I wasn’t washing my face morning and night and obviously not doing an at-home facial or even simply exfoliating. How did my skin look? In need! Adding to this, I had gone on a camping trip (where I caught the bug) the weekend before I got sick, so I wasn’t able to take great care of my skin in that situation either. What this all amounts to is my skin needed some emergency care.

Don’t despair. Whenever you are temporarily unable to take care of your skin—for whatever reason—you can do a few things on the back end to help your skin look its best going forward.

  • Drink a lot of water. It helps clear your skin and keep your organs moving toxins along. Even if you aren’t sick but just aren’t—or haven’t been—taking care of your skin, drinking more water will benefit your whole body, including your deprived skin.
  • Get back into your twice daily cleansing routine as soon as possible. Without giving your skin a general cleanse morning and night, you are asking for trouble eventually. When your circumstances change (you’re feeling better after an illness, for instance), be sure get back into your skin care routine, which also includes using a toner and hydrating with a cream(s). 
  • Give yourself an at-home facial. This involves exfoliating and using a (clay-based) mask. The addition of the mask after exfoliation will help to revive your skin and put moisture back on the surface. 
  • Exfoliate 3 days in a row. My exfoliator of choice: Yonka’s Gommage. Although exfoliating just one time (one day) is fine, if your skin is in need and especially if it’s breaking out, exfoliating for consecutive days will help to snap it back into shape. Exfoliation improves circulation, gets rid of dead skin and excess oil, and improves texture—immediately. 
  • Get a professional facial. For some, this may not be possible, but if you can, do. During a facial your aesthetician will be able to assess your specific needs and give your depleted skin everything it needs. Please don’t go in for a facial while you’re sick. Doing this puts the professional in a position to get your illness, and if you’re sick—you should be home in bed!
Getting your skin back in shape after a temporary absence from regular care isn’t so hard to do. It just takes a few steps; some every day (like drinking water and restarting your skin care routine), some weekly (like exfoliating and doing a clay mask). With this extra attention after an absence of care, your skin will be glowing again in no time!

UPDATE: 12/2015
Being sick and unable to clean your face is a perfect application for a wonderful new Yonka product. Read this article to get more information: New WATERLESS Cleanser from Yonka: EAU MICELLAIRE.

Also see:

Monday, December 20, 2010

Old skin/Young skin

Today I met a lady who asked me if I sold creams for old skin and young skin. I explained to her that although the simple answer might be “yes,” how I classify skin is first and foremost by the oil content, not age. Without knowing how much oil your sebaceous (oil) glands are producing (or not producing), you could wind up with a skin care disaster.

If you have oily skin and are 50 or 60 years old (yes, this is possible!) and you are using creams for “anti-aging” and/or mature skin, you might create an oil slick, or at the very least blackheads and possibly whiteheads. And you conceivably could be 25 and have true-dry skin in which case you would want a product that puts oil on your skin, even at that young age.

To help you understand your own personal skin type, see:
To get a better understanding of my opinion of this (mature) skin “type” and also the aging process, see: